National Moth Week

National Moth Week 2019, July 20-28

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 National Moth Week celebrates the beauty, life cycles, and habitats of moths. “Moth-ers” of all ages and abilities are encouraged to learn about, observe, and document moths in their backyards, parks, and neighborhoods. National Moth Week is being held, worldwide, during the last full week of July. NMW offers everyone, everywhere a unique opportunity to become a Citizen Scientist and contribute scientific data about moths. Through partnerships with major online biological data depositories, NMW participants can help map moth distribution and provide needed information on other life history aspects around the globe.

Why moths?

  • Moths are among the most diverse and successful organisms on earth.
  • Scientists estimate there are 150,000 to more than 500,000 moth species.
  • Their colors and patterns are either dazzling or so cryptic that they define camouflage. Shapes and sizes span the gamut from as small as a pinhead to as large as an adult’s hand.
  • Most moths are nocturnal, and need to be sought at night to be seen – others fly like butterflies during the day.
  • Finding moths can be as simple as leaving a porch light on and checking it after dark. Serious moth aficionados use special lights and baits to attract them.

 Sounds & sights from NMW 2012 

How you can help NMW:

    • Help spread the word about National Moth Week in your community. Download the National Moth week flyer (pdf) to hand out or post. 
    • Collaborate with NMW

How to participate:

Register an event or join a public event.  Mothing can be done anywhere- at parks, nature centers, backyards and even in towns and cities. Learn more at the Finding Moths page.

 

World Migratory Bird Day

World Migratory Bird Day is a global awareness-raising campaign highlighting the need to protect migratory birds and their habitats.

On the closest week end to 10 May each year, people around the world come together in order to take action and organise public events such as bird festivals, education programmes and birdwatching excursions to celebrate the Day. All events are linked through a single global campaign and theme. The theme for 2017, “Their Future is Our Future”, aimed at raising awareness on the need for a sustainable management of our natural resources, demonstrating that bird conservation is also crucial for the future of humankind.

You can find further information about the day and the annual theme on the WMBD website or on the WMBD Facebook Page.

Migratory birds are a great illustration of global interconnectedness. The birds we see in the UK in summer may have spent the winter in warmer climes. Changes to the environment or the climate in one country can have an impact on the bird migration to another country. And laws protecting birds in one country may not exist in another.

You can find further information, including a migration world map, on the Migration pages of the RSPB Learn website.